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INFOhio Blizzard Bags - Grades 9-12: Locating Information

Students follow the six dimensions of inquiry as they read, investigate, and complete the activities. Ohio's learning standards are integrated into the activities.

Locating Information: Activate Learning

Research Using ISearch technology

Use the Student Research Planning Guide document or the Cornell notes you started on the "Home" tab to keep track of your findings in this section.

  1. Using ISearch (find it in the Resources box), type the phrase social media in the search box.
    1. Skim the results listed under each tab and type or write down in a bulleted list the number of results found under each one: My Library, Encyclopedias, Basic Sources, Advanced Sources, STEAM, Open Access.
  2. Look at the results listed for social media on the Basic Sources tab. On the left side of the page, look at the box that says Subject.
    1. Type or write down two other search terms or phrases that are closely related to the search phrase social media. You may want to try separate searches for those search terms in ISearch later. Add these search terms to your notes. 
  3. Look at the results for social media on the Encyclopedia tab. 
    1. Use the "Research Starter" for good background information about your topic.
    2. Copy and paste or write the citation for the encyclopedia article in MLA or APA style in your notes. Hint: select "Cite" from "Tools" menu at the right.
    3. Email the full text of the article to yourself using the E-mail button near the top of the page or use the "Google Drive" button to save the article to your Google Drive. (make sure your pop-up blocker is turned off) 
  4. In the ISearch search box, add the word teens to social media. Look at the Subject box on the Basic Sources tab and Advanced Sources tab.
    1. Type or write down 2 synonyms, or other words that mean about the same thing, as teens. You may want to try separate searches for those search terms in ISearch later. Add these terms to your notes. 
  5. Look at the results listed for social media and teens on the STEM tab.
    1. Select the article,"The power of a single 'like': A single 'like' can make a social-media post more popular and even affect how teens behave." Read the article, adding interesting facts and information about how social media affects teens to your notes. Find the citation suggestion at the bottom of the page. Copy and paste or write down the citation for this resource.
    2. Find at least one other article on the STEM tab that discusses teens' use of social media or social networking devices that reports on the results of a research poll or survey and includes the data from that poll or survey. Read the article adding important information to your notes. Copy and paste or write down the citation for this resource. 
    3. Email the full text of the article to yourself using the E-mail button near the top right of the page, or save it to your Google Drive. 
  6. Now look at the results listed for social media and teens on the Basic Sources tab and the Advanced Sources tab.
    1. Find one source that talks about the benefits of social media and one source that talks about the drawbacks of social media.
    2. If you can't find both an article that talks about the benefits and an article that talks about the drawbacks of social networking, use some of the keywords you wrote down in steps 4 and 5 above to modify your search. 
    3. Read both of the articles you find, adding interesting information to your notes. Copy and paste or write down the citations for both resources in MLA or APA style. Hint: after you click the View/Download button, look for the yellow Cite button along the right side of the page. 
    4. Email the full text of the articles you choose to yourself using the E-mail button on the right side of the page or use the Google Drive button ot save to your Google Drive.

Before you leave this section consult your research journal to be sure that you have access to the following:

  • An encyclopedia article that provides background information on social networking sites
  • At least one article that addresses benefits of social networking for teens
  • At least one article that addresses drawbacks of social networking for teens
  • An article from a STEM perspective that addresses social networking
  • An article from a STEM perspective that reports on a research survey or poll about teens' use of social networking or social networking devices

If you are missing any of these resources, go back and try some more searches using some of the search terms you thought of in earlier steps.

Try this activity to help develop your chart and graph reading skills.  

View the printable social media chart found in the link below. Click on the PDF full text link on the left to see the chart. Then answer the following questions in your research journal.

  1. List three types of information social media brings to its users.
  2. What are two social sites that use video?
  3. What information does Yelp provide for users?
  4. What do Linked In and Facebook have in common?
  5. Choose one of the sites that you use and discuss how you use it and its purpose.

Now, in your journal, brainstorm different ways that charts and graphs can be used in social media. What are some specific examples? Find at least two used in a social media site and copy and paste the link in your research journal.

Social Networking and Primary Documents - Locating Information

Use Points of View Reference Center to find primary documents about social media.

  1. Browse the topic categories and locate the "Internet" category.  Click "More" and select  "Social Networking Sites."
  2. Once you are on the "Social Networking Sites" page, locate the box that includes a link for "Primary Documents". Click on this.
  3. Choose one of the documents from the results list. Copy and paste the permalink into Google Keep or a blank Google Doc or Word Doc where you car keeping citation information.
  4. Answer the following questions
    • Who/what is the original source of this information? Use evidence from the text to support your answer.
    • How was the information shared originally? How do you know?
    • Explain what this document is saying about social networking sites. Use two pieces of text to support your ideas.
    • Does this document have value to the general public? Why? Cite reasons from the text that help you support your answer.

Research Using Points of View Reference Center

Use the student research planning guide document or your own notes you started on the "Home" tab to keep track of your findings in this section.

  1. Using Points of View Reference Center (find it in the Resources box), locate information about social networking sites.
    1. On the Points of View opening screen, scroll down to the category labeled "Internet".
    2. Click the plus sign and then click "Social Networking Sites."
  2. Locate the "Overview" essay.
    1. Read the "Overview" essay. Add interesting and important pieces of information to your notes. Copy and paste or write the citation for the essay in Google Keep or a blank Google Doc or  Word Document where you record citation information and links. Hint: look for the yellow Cite button along the right side of the page. 
    2. Email the full text of the essay to yourself using the E-mail button on the right side of the page or use the Google Drive button to save the article to your Google Drive. 
  3. Locate the "Point" essay. 
    1. Read the "Point" essay. Add important or interesting information to your notes. You may move between the Overview, the Point and the Counterpoint essays by clicking on the colored rectangles in the sidebar featuring the Points of View icon. 
    2. At the bottom of the essay, find the "Ponder This" section. Copy and paste or write the questions from the "Ponder This" section in your notes. (Don't worry about answering the questions now. You will do this later). 
  4. Locate  the "Counterpoint" essay.
    1. Read the "Counterpoint" essay. Add important or interesting information to your notes. You may move between the Overview, the Point and the Counterpoint essays by clicking on the colored rectangles in the sidebar featuring the Points of View icon.
    2. At the bottom of the essay, find the "Ponder This" section. Copy and paste or write the questions from the "Ponder This" section in your notes. (Don't worry about answering the questions now. You will do this later). 
  5. Click the image "Social Networking Sites" located beneath the Guide to Critical Analysis.
    1. Using that image, make a list in your notes of the social networking sites that you use. You may want to use these as search terms later.
  6. Look at the "Related Information" near the upper left part of the screen.
    1. Click "Primary Source Documents." Scan the results to find a primary source document that focuses on social networking sites.
    2. Read the full text of the primary source document. Add interesting or important information to your notes. Copy and paste or write the citation for the document in Google Keep or in a blank Google Doc or Word Document to store citation information. Hint: look for the yellow Cite button along the right side of the page.   
    3.  Email the full text of the document to yourself using the E-mail button on the right side of the page or use the Google Drive button to save the article to your Google Drive.
  7. Check the privacy policies of a social media web site, preferably one you use.
    1. Using the KWL&Q Chart you already started, list some of the rights of users and what content the social media site owns.    

Before you leave this section you should have access to the following:

  • An overview essay on social networking
  • A point essay on social networking
  • A counterpoint essay on social networking
  • A primary source document on social networking

If you are missing any of these resources, go back and try some more searches using some of the search terms you thought of in earlier steps.

Research Using ISearch 

  1. Use the Defining/Limiting Your Topic document below to help you choose search terms to research social media.
  2. Complete the Search Tracking Form to become familiar with the ISearch environment. As you search, see the list below for the kinds of resources you will need.

As you complete the search tracking form and before you leave this section, you should have a working bibliography or list of sources that includes citations for the following resources:

  • An encyclopedia article on social media.
  • A primary source document related to social media in the workplace, school or politics.
  • At least one article that addresses benefits of social media and at least one article that addresses drawbacks of social media particularly in the workplace, school or politics.
  • At least one scholarly article related to social media in the workplace, school or politics.
  • At least two more resources (articles, videos, etc.) that address social media and relate to your topic.

If you are missing any of these resources, go back and try some more searches using some of the search terms you thought of in earlier steps. Email the full text of all of these articles to yourself. Use the citation helpers located in the resources to help you create your citations.

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Resources